What Happens When Galaxies Merge

Cozy Tapes Vol. 2: Too Cozy received generally positive reviews from critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream publications, the album received an average score of 70, based on five reviews. M. T. Richards of Exclaim! criticised the album for a lack of originality and cohesion: “Rocky and his acolytes convene for a rundown of trends worth exploiting; as such, it often sounds like a Migos album as interpreted by 16 clueless New Yorkers. The lack of thump and energy is fatal, throwing cold water on any chance Rocky may have had at profiting off of Migos’ grassroots momentum. At its best (“Frat Rules”), CTV2 is perfunctory; at its worst (“Get a Bag”), it denotes a scornful disinterest in what makes club-goers tick. ” Greg Whitt of Consequence of Sound commented that Cozy Tapes Vol. 2 has “a loose family vibe. One gets the sense that almost anyone who dropped by the studio as they were recording had the chance to make the album. As such, the album’s not a show of force, it’s a party. ”



Makemake is about a fifth as bright as Pluto. However, despite its comparative brightness, it was not discovered until well after a number of much fainter KBOs had been detected. Most of the scientific hunts for minor planets are conducted relatively close to the region of the sky that the Sun, Earth's Moon, and planets appear to lie in (the ecliptic). This is because there is a much greater likelihood of discovering objects there. Makemake is thought to have evaded detection during earlier searches because of its relatively high orbital inclination, as well as the fact that it was at its greatest distance from the ecliptic at the time of its discovery--in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices. Earth's Moon is enchanting; bewitching. The face of the "man"--that some cultures see etched on its brilliant surface--is really composed of the dark areas of the lunar maria (Latin for "seas"), and the lighter highlands of the Moon's surface. Some cultures tell of other examples of strange images seen on the Moon's lovely disk, such as the "Moon Rabbit". Jupiter is the fifth planet from our Star, the Sun, and it is more than twice as massive as all of the seven other major planets combined! Its immense mass weighs-in at an incredible 318 times that of the Earth.