Tiny Planets Urry

Tiny Planets was shown on ITV in its country of origin. On April 1, 2002, the original version with English graphics premiered on Noggin (now Nick Jr. ) in the United States as 5-minute segments between shows; it was expanded to a half-hour show in early June 2004, and was shown until April 9, 2006. Nick Jr. in the United States had the show’s rerun from September 28, 2009 until December 18, 2011. It also aired on ABC in Australia, K-T. V. World in South Africa, BFBS in Germany as well as Belize, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar and Bosnia and Herzegovina, TV3 in New Zealand, Kids Central in Singapore, JimJam in Malta, e-Junior in the Emirates, TVB Pearl in Hong Kong as well as Macau, Disney Channel in Asia and CBC in Canada. Localized versions were aired on Super RTL in Germany, NRK in Norway, HRT in Croatia, NHK in Japan, UBC in Thailand, SBS in Korea, Astro Ria in Malaysia, Italia 1 in Italy, Discovery Kids in Latin America, and Televisa in Mexico.



Beneath The Icy Crust Of Enceladus. The research paper written by scientists with the Cassini mission, published in the journal Science, suggests the presence of hydrogen gas. Hydrogen gas, that could potentially provide a chemical energy source for life, is pouring into the subsurface ocean of Enceladus from hydrothermal activity on the seafloor of this bewitching, distant moon-world. At last, on July 1, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft fired off its breaking rocket, glided into orbit around Saturn, and started taking pictures that left scientists in awe. It wasn't as if they hadn't been prepared for such wonders. The weeks leading up to Cassini's arrival at Saturn had served to intensify their already heated anticipation. It seemed as if each approach-picture taken was more enticing than the one preceding it. The Cassini Imaging Team discovered Methone (pronounced me-thoh-nee) on June 1, 2004. This tiny moon orbits between two of Saturn's mid-sized icy moons, Mimas and Enceladus, at a radius of about 194,000 kilometers (120,456 miles) from its planet. Astronomers have suggested two differing theories to explain the presence of Methone and two other small sister moons, Pallene and Anthe. The first theory indicates that the three little moons may have fragmented off of either Mimas or Enceladus. The second theory, on the other hand, suggests that all five moons--the three small moons and the two mid-size ones--may be the sad remnants of a larger menagerie of moons that floated around in that area--which is situated close to Saturn. Methone orbits its gigantic parent planet in 24 hours.