The New Maven NASA

Turn On the Bright Lights was released to critical acclaim. The album holds a score of 81 out of 100 from the aggregate site Metacritic based on 21 reviews, indicating “universal acclaim”. Contemporary reviews of the album often noted Interpol’s influences and drew comparisons to several other acts. Michael Chamy of The Austin Chronicle cited “melodic Peter Hook-like basslines; the divine shoegazer textures of My Bloody Valentine and Ride; a peppy, Strokes-like bounce; and a singer who’s a dead ringer for Ian Curtis. ” “It’s almost as if Ian Curtis never hanged himself,” began Blender’s review, with critic Jonah Weiner adding that Paul Banks’ vocals channeled Curtis’ “gloomy moan. ” NME’s Victoria Segal called Joy Division comparisons “obvious and unmistakable, airbourne in the ashen atmospherics,” while praising Interpol’s take on the “grey-skinned British past”. Billboard wrote that Interpol had created an “homage to their particular vision of the ’80s that stands proudly alongside the best of its idols. ” Scott Seward, writing in The Village Voice, remarked: “If I like them because they remind me of eating bad bathtub mescaline in the woods and listening to Cure singles, well, that’ll do. You might like them for completely different reasons. ”



The team of scientists used data gathered by NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, composed of a duo of twin spacecraft that circled Earth's Moon throughout 2012, each measuring the push and pull of the other as an indicator of lunar gravity. The astronomers observed this effect in the upper layer of the lunar crust, termed the megaregolith. This layer is heavily pockmarked by relatively small craters, measuring only 30 kilometers or less in diameter. In contrast, the deeper layers of lunar crust, that are scarred by larger craters, appear not to have been as badly battered, and are, therefore, less porous and fractured. Titan orbits Saturn once every 15 days and 22 hours. Like Earth's large Moon, in addition to many other moons in our Solar System, Titan's rotational period is precisely the same as its orbital period. This means that Titan only shows one face to its parent-planet, while the other face is always turned away.