The New Maven NASA

Turn On the Bright Lights was released to critical acclaim. The album holds a score of 81 out of 100 from the aggregate site Metacritic based on 21 reviews, indicating “universal acclaim”. Contemporary reviews of the album often noted Interpol’s influences and drew comparisons to several other acts. Michael Chamy of The Austin Chronicle cited “melodic Peter Hook-like basslines; the divine shoegazer textures of My Bloody Valentine and Ride; a peppy, Strokes-like bounce; and a singer who’s a dead ringer for Ian Curtis. ” “It’s almost as if Ian Curtis never hanged himself,” began Blender’s review, with critic Jonah Weiner adding that Paul Banks’ vocals channeled Curtis’ “gloomy moan. ” NME’s Victoria Segal called Joy Division comparisons “obvious and unmistakable, airbourne in the ashen atmospherics,” while praising Interpol’s take on the “grey-skinned British past”. Billboard wrote that Interpol had created an “homage to their particular vision of the ’80s that stands proudly alongside the best of its idols. ” Scott Seward, writing in The Village Voice, remarked: “If I like them because they remind me of eating bad bathtub mescaline in the woods and listening to Cure singles, well, that’ll do. You might like them for completely different reasons. ”



The team's findings can also be applied to exoplanets, which are planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Some super-Earth exoplanets, which are rocky planets more massive than our own, have been proposed as "water worlds" covered with churning oceans. Could they have life? Perhaps. The potential would certainly be there. Dr. Vance and his team believe laboratory experiments and more sophisticated modeling of exotic oceans might help to find answers to these very profound questions. The precise chemical composition of these very alien lakes and seas remained unknown until 2014, when Cassini's radar instrument detected Ligeia Mare, now known to be Titan's second-largest hydrocarbon-filled lake. Ligeia Mare is brimming with an abundance of sloshing methane, and this enormous liquid reservoir is approximately the same size as two of Earth's Great Lakes combined--Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. Many planetary scientists think that the seabed of Ligeia Mare may be blanketed with a thick layer of sludge that is composed of organic-rich compounds. The team of scientists used data gathered by NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, composed of a duo of twin spacecraft that circled Earth's Moon throughout 2012, each measuring the push and pull of the other as an indicator of lunar gravity.