Super 5 Red Giant

Super 5 is a game of chance, in Malta, in which five numbers are randomly drawn from a field of numbers from 1 to 45. Players have to match at least three of the selected numbers on one ticket to the numbers drawn. The draw for Super 5 is held every Wednesday (if a public holiday falls on a Wednesday, the draws take place on Tuesday), at 19:10, five numbers are randomly drawn in the presence of a Notary Public, members of the public, a representative of the Malta Lotteries and Gaming Authority, and representatives of Maltco Lotteries Limited. The Maltco Lotteries Limited is the company responsible for this game. The draw is transmitted live on Melita Channel 4, Melita Digital Channel 106, NET TV, and ONE TV. Results of the game are also featured on the local newspapers of Malta as well on the Maltco website. The information may also be obtained from one of Maltco Lotteries’ points of sale; and also by Vodafone’s SMS Flash, Go Mobile’s IOD, Go Plus’ Tellme service, and TVM’s teletext.



Only once since I began a twenty year fascination with Einstein's time/light theory have I heard from anyone connected to NASA who dared to address this fact to a sublimely ignorant public. He was hushed up in the slow lane with indifference and a public that couldn't tell you how the world can make it through the next decade without imploding. With a list of almost infinite problems how can we think of getting people out that far, much less plan for the return of our astronauts after 4000 generations of time. There is a bizarre rocky landscape, well hidden from our prying eyes, in the secretive shadows under the oceans of our Earth. Here, in this strange and alien domain, it is always as dark as midnight. Thin, tall towers of craggy rock emit billows of black smoke from their peaks, while all around the towers stand a weird, wavy multitude of red-and-white, tube-like organisms--that have no eyes, no intestines, and no mouth. These 3-foot-long tubeworms derive their energy from Earth itself, and not from the light of our nearby Sun--a feat that most biologists did not believe possible until these wormish creatures were discovered back in 2001. The extremely hot, superheated black water, billowing out from the hydrothermal vents erupting on Earth's seafloor, provides high-energy chemicals that sustain the tubeworms, as well as other weird organisms that apparently thrive in this very improbable habitat. Earth's Moon Reveals An Ancient Secret. Many astronomers think that during an ancient era, termed the Late Heavy Bombardment, our young Moon was violently battered by a marauding multitude of invading asteroids that crashed onto its newly formed surface. This attack of pelting objects from space occurred about 4 billion years ago, and the shower of crashing asteroids excavated impact craters, and also slashed open deep fissures, in the lunar crust. This sustained shower of merciless impacts increased lunar porosity, and opened up an intertwining network of large seams under the Moon's surface.