Space Probe Luna 3

The Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity landed on Mars to explore the Martian surface and geology, and searched for clues to past water activity on Mars. They were each launched in 2003 and landed in 2004. Communication with Spirit stopped on sol 2210 (March 22, 2010). JPL continued to attempt to regain contact until May 24, 2011, when NASA announced that efforts to communicate with the unresponsive rover had ended. Opportunity arrived at Endeavour crater on 9 August 2011, at a landmark called Spirit Point named after its rover twin, after traversing 13 miles (21 km) from Victoria crater, over a three-year period. After a planet wide dust storm in June 2018, the final communication was received on June 10, 2018, and Opportunity was declared dead on February 13, 2019. The rover lasted for almost fifteen years on Mars — although the rover was intended to last only three months.



In September 2015, a new study provided an important missing piece to the intriguing puzzle of how our Moon came to be the lovely object that we see today. What The Moon represents in You. In essence the Moon represents our emotions, responses, habits and contact needs. It symbolises the inner child that gains experience itself through the contact with others. It is our basic need to be loved and nurtured and the 'feeling' self looks to gain this from others. We usually receive this from our family and home environment and often a pet feeds our emotional self. Uncontrolled and immature emotions all come under the Moon's domain as we never lose our inner child. We often revert back into our Moon when we behave irrationally, or become moody or sulky, usually because our needs are not being met. If we feel unsafe or threatened we have a tendency to fall back on our Moon and it is by sign, house and aspect that describes how we react. We live in a Cosmic "shooting gallery". Objects inhabiting our Solar System have been profusely and mercilessly blasted by showering asteroids and comets for billions and billions of years. However, planets and large moons have their way of smoothing away the scars--their strong gravity pulls them into a nice ball-like spherical shape. Furthermore, some of these larger spheres possess sufficient internal heat to cause flows of fiery lava and other volcanic features that can fill in the scars of impact craters. A few such large bodies are blasted by strong winds and pouring rains, which also erode away the pockmarks left on their surfaces by showering impactors.