Samsung Galaxy Star Pro

The Samsung Galaxy Star is a low-end smartphone manufactured by Samsung Electronics. It is running on Android 4. 1. 2(jelly Bean). It has unofficial Android 4. 4, 5. 1, 6. 0. 1 and 7. 1 roms. It was announced in April 2013, it was subsequently released in May 2013. It is the cheapest smartphone in the Samsung Galaxy series. Like all other Samsung Galaxy smartphones, the Galaxy Star runs on the Android mobile operating system. The phone is available in 2 versions: a single SIM version (GT-S5280) and a dual SIM version (GT-S5282). The phone competes with other low-cost smartphones such as the smartphones from the Nokia Asha series as well as low-cost smartphones manufactured by Indian manufacturers such as Micromax, Karbonn, Spice Digital, Lava International and Celkon. It is available in certain Asian countries such as India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Philippines, Indonesia etc. where low-cost smartphones are very popular as well as in Morocco, Algeria, South Africa, Portugal, France, Germany, Russia and Ukraine.
Brazilian version is also released, dubbed GT-S5283B.



Despite this oddball moon's many exotic attributes, it actually sports one of the most Earth-like surfaces in our Solar System. Titan may also experience volcanic activity, but its volcanoes would erupt with different ingredients than the molten-rock lava that shoots out from the volcanoes of Earth. In dramatic contrast to what occurs on our own planet, Titan's volcanoes erupt icy water "lava" (cryovolcanism). Titan's entire alien surface has been sculpted by gushing methane and ethane, which carves river channels, and fills its enormous great lakes with liquid natural gas. The scientists also ruled out the possibility that the mysterious features actually exist on Titan's surface in the form of frozen methane rain or icy lava erupted from cryovolcanoes. Such surface features would show a different chemical signature and would be visible for much longer periods of time than the bright features observed in this study. The bright features were visible from time spans of only 11 hours to five weeks. The astronomers observed this effect in the upper layer of the lunar crust, termed the megaregolith. This layer is heavily pockmarked by relatively small craters, measuring only 30 kilometers or less in diameter. In contrast, the deeper layers of lunar crust, that are scarred by larger craters, appear not to have been as badly battered, and are, therefore, less porous and fractured.