Planets Paper Band



Have you ever wondered what may be the purpose of the moon? Well, the moon is the shiny beacon that lights up the night as the sun lights up the day. This amber body is quite shy and doesn't always show itself, but when it does, the moon's brilliance overpowers the darkness. The surface of the moon inspires astronomers around the globe who religiously watch as our incandescent orb passes serenely through its natural cycle, but if you are an avid planet observer you will come to realise that the reflecting light from the moon through the telescope lens may interfere with your ability to clearly view even our closest planets. For this reason many planet watches believe the new moon cycle is the perfect time to catch a glimpse of another world. The original goal of Cassini-Huygens was to study Saturn and its large, misty, tortured, moon Titan. Titan, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, after Ganymede of Jupiter, is a world long-shrouded in mystery, hiding behind a thick orange veil, and slashed with hydrocarbon lakes and seas. However, there are other enticing moons known to circle the ringed planet. Saturn's mid-sized icy moons (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, and Phoebe) are enchanting worlds. Each one of these frozen little moons reveals an interesting and unique geology. So far, Saturn is known to sport 62 icy moons! Most of the moons of our Sun's family circle the quartet of large gaseous planets located in our Solar System's outer limits: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The four solid inner planets--Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars--are almost entirely moonless. Earth is the only inner planet that hosts a large Moon, while Mars sports only a pathetic duo of misshapen little Moons (Phobos and Deimos), that are either captured asteroids that escaped from the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter, or are instead the outcome of a primordial collision between Mars and a large protoplanet.