Planetary Nebula Mycn18

The first planetary nebula discovered (though not yet termed as such) was the Dumbbell Nebula in the constellation of Vulpecula. It was observed by Charles Messier in 1764 and listed as M27 in his catalogue of nebulous objects. To early observers with low-resolution telescopes, M27 and subsequently discovered planetary nebulae resembled the giant planets like Uranus. William Herschel, discoverer of Uranus, perhaps coined the term “planetary nebula”. However, in as early as January 1779, the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix described in his observations of the Ring Nebula, “a very dull nebula, but perfectly outlined; as large as Jupiter and looks like a fading planet”. Whatever the true origin of the term, the label “planetary nebula” became ingrained in the terminology used by astronomers to categorize these types of nebulae, and is still in use by astronomers today.



The original goal of Cassini-Huygens was to study Saturn and its large, misty, tortured, moon Titan. Titan, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, after Ganymede of Jupiter, is a world long-shrouded in mystery, hiding behind a thick orange veil, and slashed with hydrocarbon lakes and seas. However, there are other enticing moons known to circle the ringed planet. Saturn's mid-sized icy moons (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, and Phoebe) are enchanting worlds. Each one of these frozen little moons reveals an interesting and unique geology. So far, Saturn is known to sport 62 icy moons! What I discovered was that both the weather and moon were in my favor on my best days fishing. So basically I was fishing at the perfect time and didn't realize it. So then I began to wonder if I could use this information to my advantage. I figured out that I most certainly could use this information to my advantage by learning some simple tips about what the weather was doing and what phase the moon was in before I headed out onto the water. "We are just beginning to try and figure out quantitatively how all this might smooth a surface," Dr. Thomas said in the May 17, 2013 New Scientist.