New Black Hole Discovered

Shortly after the dissolution of Medication, Logan formed the band New Black, which was later changed to Stereo Black. Although the band opened for a local Hed PE gig, tracked a full demo, shopped it to a few labels and created an internet buzz, they were never signed. Years later, the Stereo Black track Save Me which was later called Inside. The song was featured in the trailer for Max Payne and The Butterfly Effect 2 and in the direct to video film Never Back Down 2: The Beatdown. The instrumental of their song Fall Again was featured on the soundtrack of racing game MotoGP ’07. In 2011, they created a song for the Scream 4 soundtrack, titled “Denial”. However, in 2017 Mader dismissed Stereo Black as a studio project, initially created in order to write songs for commercial licensing, and that the attempt to turn it into a full-band was somewhat half-hearted as he was beginning to move into becoming a full-time producer.



However, Dr. Thomas explained to the press in May 2013 that the ring arcs are much more tenuous than the fully formed rings of Saturn. As a matter of fact, the ring arcs are so delicate and thin that it would take about ten billion years for just 1 meter of blowing icy snow to collect within the craters of Methone. For all its romance inspiring awesomeness, the moon has another side to its personality. Werewolves, mood swings and even wild behavior are often blamed on the full moon. How many times have you heard the question acrimoniously asked, "is it a full moon tonight?" Enshrouded in a dense golden hydrocarbon mist, Saturn's largest moon Titan is a mysterious mesmerizing world in its own right. For centuries, Titan's veiled, frigid surface was completely camouflaged by this hazy golden-orange cloud-cover that hid its icy surface from the prying eyes of curious observers on Earth. However, this misty moisty moon-world was finally forced to show its mysterious face, long-hidden behind its obscuring veil of fog, when the Cassini Spacecraft's Huygens Probe landed on its surface in 2004, sending revealing pictures back to astronomers on Earth. In September 2018, astronomers announced that new data obtained from Cassini show what appear to be gigantic, roaring dust storms, raging through the equatorial regions of Titan. The discovery, announced in the September 24, 2018 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience, makes this oddball moon-world the third known object in our Solar System--in addition to Earth and Mars--where ferocious dust storms have been observed. The observations are now shedding new light on the fascinating and dynamic environment of Titan, which is the second largest moon in our Solar System, after Ganymede of Jupiter.