Nebula- class Starship Pod

Most nebulae are of vast size; some are hundreds of light-years in diameter. A nebula that is visible to the human eye from Earth would appear larger, but no brighter, from close by. The Orion Nebula, the brightest nebula in the sky and occupying an area twice the diameter of the full Moon, can be viewed with the naked eye but was missed by early astronomers. Although denser than the space surrounding them, most nebulae are far less dense than any vacuum created on Earth – a nebular cloud the size of the Earth would have a total mass of only a few kilograms. Many nebulae are visible due to fluorescence caused by embedded hot stars, while others are so diffuse they can only be detected with long exposures and special filters. Some nebulae are variably illuminated by T Tauri variable stars.
Nebulae are often star-forming regions, such as in the “Pillars of Creation” in the Eagle Nebula. In these regions the formations of gas, dust, and other materials “clump” together to form denser regions, which attract further matter, and eventually will become dense enough to form stars. The remaining material is then believed to form planets and other planetary system objects.



The bottom line is that the moon and fishing are inexorably linked, and it will serve you well to educate yourself as to how it all works. Just understanding the phases of the moon and which are better for fishing than others is of huge importance. As a matter of fact this free e-book will teach you what you need to know, and again it won't cost you anything. It's all free! What could be a better deal than that? I would also suggest that you never forget what the reverend McLain said in the movie A River Runs Through It, "Anyone who does not know how to catch a fish shouldn't be able to disgrace that fish by catching it." To that I say, Amen reverend, Amen! Enceladus: Enceladus has shown geysers of water that were confirmed by the Cassini spacecraft in 2005. Gravimetric data obtained from 2010 to 2011 confirmed the existence of a subsurface ocean. Even though originally it was thought to be localized, most likely in a region of the icy moon's southern hemisphere, evidence collected in 2015 indicates the subsurface ocean is actually global. Furthermore, in additon to water, these geysers from vents located near the south pole of Enceladus contain tiny quantities of salt, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and volatile hydrocarbons. Tidal flux from Saturn is apparently responsible for the melting of the ocean water, as well as the geysers. The surface of our Moon's near-side is dominated by the bewildering and unique Procellarum region, and this area is characterized by numerous ancient volcanic plains, low elevations, and a strangely unique composition.