NASA X-43A Jet

Producers Krigsvold and Bibbo were the original creators of NASA’s Destination Tomorrow (2000-2007) and NASA 360 (2007-2012).
On June 6, 2007, NASA 360 won the Emmy for non-news program editing from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, which includes 29 media outlets in Washington D. C. , Virginia and Maryland.
NASA 360 has won numerous other awards, including (4) Communicator Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Omni Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Davey Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Marcom Awards,(2) Ava Awards, (2) Videographer Awards, (4) additional Telly awards (including the 30th Anniversary Telly for Overall Program and Editing), and (2) EMPIXX awards.
In 2010, Michael Bibbo and 2nd camera operator, Tom Shortridge won the 2nd place award for NASA Videographer of the Year in the production category.



Had Jupiter continued to gain weight, it would have grown ever hotter and hotter, and ultimately self-sustaining, raging nuclear-fusing fires may have been ignited in its heart. This would have sent Jupiter down that long, shining stellar road to full-fledged stardom. Had this occurred, Jupiter and our Sun would have been binary stellar sisters, and we probably would not be here now to tell the story. Our planet, and its seven lovely sisters, as well as all of the moons and smaller objects dancing around our Star, would not have been able to form. However, Jupiter failed to reach stardom. After its brilliant, sparkling birth, it began to shrink. Today, Jupiter emits a mere.00001 as much radiation as our Sun, and its luminosity is only.0000001 that of our Star. The team's findings can also be applied to exoplanets, which are planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Some super-Earth exoplanets, which are rocky planets more massive than our own, have been proposed as "water worlds" covered with churning oceans. Could they have life? Perhaps. The potential would certainly be there. Dr. Vance and his team believe laboratory experiments and more sophisticated modeling of exotic oceans might help to find answers to these very profound questions. "We are just beginning to try and figure out quantitatively how all this might smooth a surface," Dr. Thomas said in the May 17, 2013 New Scientist.