NASA X-43A Jet

Producers Krigsvold and Bibbo were the original creators of NASA’s Destination Tomorrow (2000-2007) and NASA 360 (2007-2012).
On June 6, 2007, NASA 360 won the Emmy for non-news program editing from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, which includes 29 media outlets in Washington D. C. , Virginia and Maryland.
NASA 360 has won numerous other awards, including (4) Communicator Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Omni Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Davey Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Marcom Awards,(2) Ava Awards, (2) Videographer Awards, (4) additional Telly awards (including the 30th Anniversary Telly for Overall Program and Editing), and (2) EMPIXX awards.
In 2010, Michael Bibbo and 2nd camera operator, Tom Shortridge won the 2nd place award for NASA Videographer of the Year in the production category.



The GRAIL mission was managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The mission was part of the Discovery Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The team's findings can also be applied to exoplanets, which are planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Some super-Earth exoplanets, which are rocky planets more massive than our own, have been proposed as "water worlds" covered with churning oceans. Could they have life? Perhaps. The potential would certainly be there. Dr. Vance and his team believe laboratory experiments and more sophisticated modeling of exotic oceans might help to find answers to these very profound questions. We live in a Cosmic "shooting gallery". Objects inhabiting our Solar System have been profusely and mercilessly blasted by showering asteroids and comets for billions and billions of years. However, planets and large moons have their way of smoothing away the scars--their strong gravity pulls them into a nice ball-like spherical shape. Furthermore, some of these larger spheres possess sufficient internal heat to cause flows of fiery lava and other volcanic features that can fill in the scars of impact craters. A few such large bodies are blasted by strong winds and pouring rains, which also erode away the pockmarks left on their surfaces by showering impactors.