NASA X-43

Producers Krigsvold and Bibbo were the original creators of NASA’s Destination Tomorrow (2000-2007) and NASA 360 (2007-2012).
On June 6, 2007, NASA 360 won the Emmy for non-news program editing from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, which includes 29 media outlets in Washington D. C. , Virginia and Maryland.
NASA 360 has won numerous other awards, including (4) Communicator Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Omni Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Davey Awards for overall program and editing, (2) Marcom Awards,(2) Ava Awards, (2) Videographer Awards, (4) additional Telly awards (including the 30th Anniversary Telly for Overall Program and Editing), and (2) EMPIXX awards.
In 2010, Michael Bibbo and 2nd camera operator, Tom Shortridge won the 2nd place award for NASA Videographer of the Year in the production category.



There are over 100 moons dancing around the eight major planets of our Sun's family. Most of them are small, frozen, icy objects, harboring only a relatively scanty amount of rocky material, that circle around the quartet of giant gaseous planets that dwell in the outer, frigid realm of our Solar System--far from the comforting warmth and brilliance of our Star. The quartet of majestic, giant denizens of our outer Solar System--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--are enveloped with gaseous atmospheres, and orbited by a multitude of dancing, sparkling moons and moonlets. In marked contrast, the inner region of our Solar System--where our Earth dwells--is almost bereft of moons. Of the quartet of relatively petite, rocky "terrestrial" planets--Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars--only Earth is circled by a large Moon. Mercury and Venus are moonless, and Mars is orbited by a duo of tiny, lumpy, potato-shaped moons, Phobos and Deimos. Phobos and Deimos are probably escaped asteroids, born in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter, that were captured by the gravitational embrace of the Red Planet long ago. On March 27, 2012, Cassini made its closest flyby yet over Enceladus's "tiger stripes". In a string of enticingly close passes over the dazzling moon, the spacecraft saw more hints that watery jets may be shooting out into Space from an immense subsurface sea. The jets, tearing through cracks in the moon's icy crust, could lead back to a zone harboring living tidbits. If you would like to know just when the moon rise and moon set is going to be there are hundreds of site out on the internet which will give you the rise and set times for your area. Just go to Google or any of the other major search engines and do a search for moon rise/set times and while your there remember to check out the moon phases while you are there as well. If you follow these steps as out line above you will be catching more fish and enjoying the sport fishing even more.