Mars Spirit Rover Found



At last, on July 1, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft fired off its breaking rocket, glided into orbit around Saturn, and started taking pictures that left scientists in awe. It wasn't as if they hadn't been prepared for such wonders. The weeks leading up to Cassini's arrival at Saturn had served to intensify their already heated anticipation. It seemed as if each approach-picture taken was more enticing than the one preceding it. A billion years ago, our Moon was closer to Earth than it is now. As a result, it appeared to be a much larger object in the sky. During that ancient era, if human beings had been around to witness such a sight, it would have been possible to see the entire Moon--not merely the one near side face that we see now. A billion years ago, it took our Moon only twenty days to orbit our planet, and Earth's own day was considerably shorter--only eighteen hours long. Stupendous, almost unimaginably enormous tides, that were more than a kilometer in height, would ebb and flow every few hours. However, things changed, as the lunar orbit around our primordial planet grew ever wider and wider. Annually, Earth's Moon moves about 1.6 inches farther out into space. Currently, the lunar rate of rotation, as well as the time it takes to circle our planet, are the same. The bottom line is that the moon and fishing are inexorably linked, and it will serve you well to educate yourself as to how it all works. Just understanding the phases of the moon and which are better for fishing than others is of huge importance. As a matter of fact this free e-book will teach you what you need to know, and again it won't cost you anything. It's all free! What could be a better deal than that? I would also suggest that you never forget what the reverend McLain said in the movie A River Runs Through It, "Anyone who does not know how to catch a fish shouldn't be able to disgrace that fish by catching it." To that I say, Amen reverend, Amen!