Largest Volcano in the Solar System



For this reason, astronomers have for years considered the possibility that hydrocarbon lakes and seas might exist on the surface of this misty moisty moon. The data derived from Cassini/Huygens validated this prediction. During its long and productive mission, now over, Cassini revealed that almost 2% of Titan's entire bizarre surface is coated wth gasoline-like liquids. On March 27, 2012, Cassini made its closest flyby yet over Enceladus's "tiger stripes". In a string of enticingly close passes over the dazzling moon, the spacecraft saw more hints that watery jets may be shooting out into Space from an immense subsurface sea. The jets, tearing through cracks in the moon's icy crust, could lead back to a zone harboring living tidbits. Titan is certainly an exotic, fascinating, frigid oddball, that bears an eerie resemblance to the primordial Earth before life emerged and evolved on our planet (prebiotic). In fact, Titan is the only moon in our entire Solar System with a substantial atmosphere. It is also the only known world--other than Earth--where stable bodies of surface liquid exist.