Labeled Solar System by Size solar system diagram to label let39s learn! pinterest by Solar Size Labeled System

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Curious facts about cosmic life and their inhabitants.

The very productive Cassini mission might attain some indirect information by analyzing the ring arc material--however, it is unlikely to come close to the little moon again before the mission ends in 2017.



and here is another

In Western astrology, the Sun represents who we are in the world, the outward projection of our personality, and the mark we wish to make. By contrast, the moon governs our emotions, our primal instincts, and our unconscious mind. It represents a feminine energy, and is often personified as a goddess or mother. In other words, those deep intuitive urges-those passionate feelings we can't quite describe-are embodied in the moon. No wonder so many love poems have been penned under the influence of its rays!



and finally

Comets are really traveling relic icy planetesimals, the remnants of what was once a vast population of ancient objects that contributed to the construction of the quartet of giant, gaseous planets of the outer Solar System: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Alternatively, the asteroids--that primarily inhabit the region between Mars and Jupiter termed the Main Asteroid Belt--are the leftover rocky and metallic planetesimals that bumped into one another and then merged together to form the four rocky and metallic inner planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. Planetesimals of both the rocky and icy kind blasted into one another in the cosmic "shooting gallery" that was our young Solar System. These colliding objects also merged together to create ever larger and larger bodies--from pebble size, to boulder size, to mountain size--and, finally, to planet size.

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The surface of our Moon's near-side is dominated by the bewildering and unique Procellarum region, and this area is characterized by numerous ancient volcanic plains, low elevations, and a strangely unique composition.



When Jupiter was born along with the rest of our Solar System, approximately 4.56 billion years ago, it twinkled like a star. The energy that it emitted--as a result of tumbling surrounding material--made Jupiter's interior searing-hot. In fact, the larger Jupiter grew, the hotter it became. At long last, when the material that it had drawn in from the whirling, swirling surrounding protoplanetary accretion disk--made up of nurturing dust and gas--was depleted, Jupiter may well have attained the enormous diameter of over 10 times what it has today. It also may have reached a truly toasty central temperature of about 50,000 Kelvin. During that long ago era, Jupiter twinkled, glittered, and sparkled like a little star, shining ferociously with a fire that was approximately 1% that of our much more brilliant Sun today.



During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on October 28, 2015, it detected molecular hydrogen as the spacecraft zipped through the plume of ice grains and gas spraying out from cracks slashing though the icy crust of the moon-world. Earlier flybys provided hints that a global subsurface ocean did, indeed, exist, sloshing around above a rocky core. Molecular hydrogen in the plumes could indicate hydrothermal processes, which could play the important role of providing the chemical energy so necessary to support life as we know it. In order to hunt for hydrogen specifically originating on Enceladus, the spacecraft dived particularly close to the strange slashed surface.