John Hagee Four Red Moons

In April 2018, the Jewish News Syndicate in partnership with the Israel Embassy in Washington DC released a list of the 70 greatest American contributors to the US-Israel relationship in honor of the upcoming 70th anniversary of Israel’s declaration of independence in 1948. On the list, Hagee was awarded the position of 27 out of 70 for his work raising over 100 million dollars for Jewish and Israeli charities and founding Christians United for Israel, the largest pro-Israel organization in America with over 4 million members. On May 14, 2018, while Hagee was in Jerusalem for the opening ceremony of the US Embassy, his son Matt Hagee accepted the Israeli Embassy’s award on his father’s behalf in a private Washington DC ceremony.



A Moon Made Of Lightweight Fluff! Methone is small and oval--and unlike other tiny objects, composed of rock and ice, that scurry around our Solar System. Methone, which was observed up close for the very first time in 2012, is not pockmarked by impacts like other worldlets of its kind. Instead, this strange little moon, is very smooth--it shows not a hill nor an impact crater anywhere on its weirdly smooth surface. This shiny, white, icy egg in Space, residing in a peaceful nest of ice crystals, is an enigma wrapped in a bewildering mystery that some astronomers may have solved. The answer to the bewitching riddle of Methone? It is composed of lightweight fluff! The precise chemical composition of these very alien lakes and seas remained unknown until 2014, when Cassini's radar instrument detected Ligeia Mare, now known to be Titan's second-largest hydrocarbon-filled lake. Ligeia Mare is brimming with an abundance of sloshing methane, and this enormous liquid reservoir is approximately the same size as two of Earth's Great Lakes combined--Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. Many planetary scientists think that the seabed of Ligeia Mare may be blanketed with a thick layer of sludge that is composed of organic-rich compounds. It is not a very expensive stone and is made into necklaces or bigger pieces for jewelry purposes. I especially like the deep, dark blue version with golden pyrite sprinkles creating very unique patterns mined only in Afghanistan. The lighter blue, grayish variety is found in Chile.