Jay Jordan and Eva Cassini

At the time Jordan joined OCLC, the nonprofit organization represented 30,000 libraries. 14 years later technological developments had completely changed the information society and the use of libraries. During Jordan’s term as president, OCLC tried to adapt to these new developments. WorldCat holdings grew during this period (to 290 million bibliographic records from 72,000 libraries) and WorldCat. org was made available on the open web. At the same time OCLC developed new services (like Question Point). OCLC made several acquisitions such as the Research Libraries Group (2006), PICA (2007), Ezproxy (2008) and OAIster (2009). OCLC sold NetLibrary in 2010. VIAF was implemented and hosted by OCLC. VIAF is a service to link identical records from different data sets together, thereby making it easier for patrons to find e. g. books from Dostoyevsky/Dosto├»evski



Full moons make for a wonderful setting for criminal activity, as we find in detective novels. It's that night when the gruesome murderer commits the ghastly crime and is seen by a non-descript, aged neighbor. The neighbor's claim to credibility in the witness box is the fact that there was a full moon on the night in question and everything was there for all to see; it was only a matter of chance that he or she was the only one to spot it! Full moon nights also offer the perfect cover for the snooping detective to hide behind the bush with his dim-witted assistant in tow. An Icy Nest Of Space Eggs. Methone is actually only one member of an icy nest of Space eggs, which also includes the very strange and smooth moons of Saturn, Pallene and Aegaeon. Aegaeon is a very, very small moonlet that also twirls around between Mimas and Enceladus. Like Methone, Aegaeon displays a mysteriously unblemished surface. Other authors make similar assertions. In Our Mysterious Spaceship Moon (Dell, 1975), author Don Wilson publishes the following conversation between the Eagle crew and Mission Control, presumably picked up by ham radio operators during a broadcast interruption attributed by NASA to an "overheated camera":