James Webb Telescope vs Hubble

The primary mirror of the JWST, the Optical Telescope Element, is composed of 18 hexagonal mirror segments made of gold-plated beryllium which combine to create a 6. 5-meter (21 ft; 260 in) diameter mirror that is much larger than the Hubble’s 2. 4-meter (7. 9 ft; 94 in) mirror. Unlike the Hubble, which observes in the near ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared (0. 1 to 1 μm) spectra, the JWST will observe in a lower frequency range, from long-wavelength visible light through mid-infrared (0. 6 to 27 μm), which will allow it to observe high redshift objects that are too old and too distant for the Hubble to observe. The telescope must be kept very cold in order to observe in the infrared without interference, so it will be deployed in space near the Earth–Sun L2 Lagrangian point, and a large sunshield made of silicon- and aluminum-coated Kapton will keep its mirror and instruments below 50 K (−220 °C; −370 °F).



Each of the little Space eggs resides within its own ring arc--which is a fragmentary ring of Saturn. One hypothesis states that glittering ice crystals swarming around in the ring arc might be floating down to the surface of Methone, filling in its impact craters or other rough topography. This is something that is thought to have occurred on two other small, icy moons of Saturn--Atlas and Pan. Icy stuff swarming around in Saturn's rings apparently piled up around each moonlet's equator. What The Moon represents in You. In essence the Moon represents our emotions, responses, habits and contact needs. It symbolises the inner child that gains experience itself through the contact with others. It is our basic need to be loved and nurtured and the 'feeling' self looks to gain this from others. We usually receive this from our family and home environment and often a pet feeds our emotional self. Uncontrolled and immature emotions all come under the Moon's domain as we never lose our inner child. We often revert back into our Moon when we behave irrationally, or become moody or sulky, usually because our needs are not being met. If we feel unsafe or threatened we have a tendency to fall back on our Moon and it is by sign, house and aspect that describes how we react. The original goal of Cassini-Huygens was to study Saturn and its large, misty, tortured, moon Titan. Titan, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, after Ganymede of Jupiter, is a world long-shrouded in mystery, hiding behind a thick orange veil, and slashed with hydrocarbon lakes and seas. However, there are other enticing moons known to circle the ringed planet. Saturn's mid-sized icy moons (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, and Phoebe) are enchanting worlds. Each one of these frozen little moons reveals an interesting and unique geology. So far, Saturn is known to sport 62 icy moons!