Hubble Dark Matter



A Distant, Dusty Moon. Titan experiences changing seasons--just like Earth. In particular, Titan's seasons change around the equinox, when our Sun passes Titan's equator. At this time, huge clouds can form in tropical areas, resulting in violent methane storms. Cassini observed these ferocious methane storms during several of its flybys over Titan. Comets are really traveling relic icy planetesimals, the remnants of what was once a vast population of ancient objects that contributed to the construction of the quartet of giant, gaseous planets of the outer Solar System: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Alternatively, the asteroids--that primarily inhabit the region between Mars and Jupiter termed the Main Asteroid Belt--are the leftover rocky and metallic planetesimals that bumped into one another and then merged together to form the four rocky and metallic inner planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. Planetesimals of both the rocky and icy kind blasted into one another in the cosmic "shooting gallery" that was our young Solar System. These colliding objects also merged together to create ever larger and larger bodies--from pebble size, to boulder size, to mountain size--and, finally, to planet size. There is yet another theory that planetary scientists have suggested to explain the mysterious Procellarum region. This analysis is based on recently acquired data, and it indicates that this region formed as a consequence of churning deep within the interior of our Moon. According to this model, this resulted in a high concentration of heat-producing radioactive elements in the lunar crust and mantle of this unique region. Planetary scientists studied the gradients in gravity data derived from GRAIL, which showed a rectangular shape in resulting gravitational anomalies.