How Many Solar System how many planets are there lerne sefe Many How System Solar

How Many Solar System how many planets are there lerne sefe Many How System Solar

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A little interesting about space life.

The Solar System forms a tiny part of the Milky Way Galaxy, a vast conglomeration of stars and planets. What makes astronomy so thrilling is that despite its size, the Milky Way is not the only galaxy in the universe. There are hundreds of billions of galaxies out there, probably more. The closest galaxy to our own Milky Way is Andromeda. Now, brace yourself for the distance: it is 2.3 million light years away. One of the most exciting phenomena for astronomers is the black hole. It is an area of the universe where the concentration of mass is so massive (no pun intended) that the gravitational pull it generates sucks in everything around it. Everything includes light. Remember that the escape velocity for any object in the universe is the speed required to escape the objects gravitational pull. The escape velocity for the Earth is slightly over 11 kilometers per hour while for the Moon is 2.5 kilometers per second. Well for a black hole, the escape velocity exceeds the speed of light. That is how strong the pull is.



and here is another

Astronomers are still debating Titan's origin. However, its intriguing atmosphere does provide a hint. Several instruments aboard the Huygens spacecraft measured the isotopes nitrogen-14 and nitrogen-15 in Titan's atmosphere. The instruments revealed that Titan's nitrogen isotope ratio most closely resembles that seen in comets that exist in the remote Oort Cloud--which is a sphere composed of hundreds of billions of icy comet nuclei that circle our Star at the amazing distance of between 5,000 and 100,000 AU. This shell of icy objects extends half way to the nearest star beyond our own Sun.



and finally

The fact that Enceladus becomes so extremely distorted suggests that it contains quite a bit of water. A watery moon would, of course, be a flexible one. Therefore, for Enceladus to be as flexible as it apparently is, it must hold either an enormous local ocean or one that is global. Parts of that immense ocean may be pleasantly warm--but other portions might be quite hot.

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The rifts themselves are buried far, far down, deep beneath dark volcanic plains on the near-side of our Moon and have been spotted only in the gravity data provided by GRAIL. The lava-flooded rift valleys are not like anything seen anywhere else on the lunar surface--but some planetary scientists think that they may have, at one time, long ago, resembled rift zones on our own planet, Venus, and Mars. The new findings are published in the October 1, 2014 issue of the journal Nature.



However, when people ask whether mankind has the capability to go to the Moon again, unfortunately the answer is an absolute no. Even though mankind has much more advanced space technology as compared to 1960's; the current technology is not geared toward moon flight. In fact, even the US has lost the capability of the Saturn rockets due to the fact that production facilities have been dismantled. In time, even the know-how has become obsolete, as people who have worked in the Saturn program have retired or died. Hence, even if the US wanted to go to the moon today, a manned flight would be impossible for at least another decade.



Brilliant, icy short-period comets invade the bright and toasty inner Solar System, far from their frozen domain in the Kuiper Belt. The Kuiper Belt is the reservoir of comet nuclei that is located closest to Earth. Short-period comets rampage into the inner Solar System more frequently than every 200 years. The more distant long-period comets streak into the inner Solar System's melting warmth and comforting light every 200 years--at least--from the Oort Cloud. Because Earth dwells closer to the Kuiper Belt than to the Oort Cloud, short-period comets are much more frequent invaders, and have played a more important part in Earth's history than their long-period kin. Nevertheless, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are sufficiently small, distant, and dim to have escaped the reach of our scientific technology until 1992.