Hellenistic Culture Astronomy lecture 2 Astronomy Culture Hellenistic

Hellenistic Culture Astronomy lecture 2 Astronomy Culture Hellenistic

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A little interesting about space life.

The original goal of Cassini-Huygens was to study Saturn and its large, misty, tortured, moon Titan. Titan, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, after Ganymede of Jupiter, is a world long-shrouded in mystery, hiding behind a thick orange veil, and slashed with hydrocarbon lakes and seas. However, there are other enticing moons known to circle the ringed planet. Saturn's mid-sized icy moons (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, and Phoebe) are enchanting worlds. Each one of these frozen little moons reveals an interesting and unique geology. So far, Saturn is known to sport 62 icy moons!



and here is another

The astronomers observed this effect in the upper layer of the lunar crust, termed the megaregolith. This layer is heavily pockmarked by relatively small craters, measuring only 30 kilometers or less in diameter. In contrast, the deeper layers of lunar crust, that are scarred by larger craters, appear not to have been as badly battered, and are, therefore, less porous and fractured.



and finally

Still, the moon is important and interesting to all of us who live in sight of its majestic beauty. We never tire wondering about it. In this article, we will talk about the moon, its cycles and the phenomenon known as the "blue moon." Then, we will even give you a heads up as to when you can expect the next several full moons.

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Astronomers have known for years that the temperatures of the lunar near-side are higher than those on the far-side. This is because the abundances of the heat- producing elements uranium and thorium are greater on the near-side than on the far-side. In addition, these higher temperatures are a consequence of the fact that most of the volcanic eruptions occurred on the lunar near-side.



The nitrogen that exists in Titan's atmosphere indicates that it likely formed early in our Solar System's 4.56 billion-year-old history. This means that Titan probably was born within the same cold disk of gas and dust that gave birth to our Sun (protostellar nebula), instead of forming in the warmer disk that eventually created Saturn.



Indeed, the mixture of nitrogen and methane that whirl around in Titan's swirling thick golden-orange atmosphere create a variety of organic compounds. It has been suggested that the heaviest materials float down to the surface of this hydrocarbon-slashed moon. When these organic compounds tumble down into Titan's lakes and seas--either by raining down from the clouds in alien showers of hydrocarbons, or by traveling along with Titan's strange rivers--some are dissolved in the liquid methane. The compounds that manage to survive this ordeal, and do not dissolve (such as nitrites and benzene), float down to the alien sea floors of this oddball moon-world.