Gliese 581 Location Relative to Earth

An M-class dwarf star such as Gliese 581 has a much lower mass than the Sun, causing the core region of the star to fuse hydrogen at a significantly lower rate. From the apparent magnitude and distance, astronomers have estimated an effective temperature of 3200 K and a visual luminosity of 0. 2% of that of the Sun. However, a red dwarf such as Gliese 581 radiates primarily in the near infrared, with peak emission at a wavelength of roughly 830 nm (estimated using Wien’s displacement law, which assumes the star radiates as a black body), so such an estimate will underestimate the star’s total luminosity. (For comparison, the peak emission of the Sun is roughly 530 nm, in the middle of the visible part of the spectrum. ) When radiation over the entire spectrum is taken into account (not just the part that humans are able to see), something known as the bolometric correction, this star has a bolometric luminosity 1. 3% of the Sun’s total luminosity. A planet would need to be situated much closer to this star in order to receive a comparable amount of energy as the Earth. The region of space around a star where a planet would receive roughly the same energy as the Earth is sometimes termed the “Goldilocks Zone”, or, more prosaically, the habitable zone. The extent of such a zone is not fixed and is highly specific for each planetary system. Gliese 581 is a very old star. Its slow rotation makes it very inactive, making it better suited than most red dwarfs for having habitable planets.



Therefore, the results of the new study support the idea that primitive life could potentially have evolved on Ganymede. This is because places where water and rock interact are important for the development of life. For example, some theories suggest that life arose on our planet within hot, bubbling seafloor vents. Before the new study, Ganymede's rocky seafloor was believed to be coated with ice--not liquid. This would have presented a problem for the evolution of living tidbits. The "Dagwood sandwich" findings, however, indicate something else entirely--the first layer on top of Ganymede's rocky core might be made up of precious, life-sustaining salty water. However, the astronomers will require more HST observations in order to obtain accurate measurements in order to determine if the moon's orbit is circular or elliptical. Preliminary estimates suggest that if the moon is in a circular orbit, it finishes a circle around Makemake in 12 days or longer. The Moon in the Birth Chart. The Moon is a very important planet in the Birth Chart as it is from this that we operate from through childhood and thus it becomes our foundation. Although we grow towards our Sun (our own 'mind') in adulthood, the Moon is a 'feeling, reflective' energy that picks up and stores early messages and experiences. Many of our behavioural and emotional problems can be uncovered by examining the role of Moon in the Natal Chart. The Moon informs and represents the way we habitually respond and react throughout life. It denotes our instinctive behaviour and the sign it is in describes its innate quality, whereas the house reflects the environmental influence. Any aspect to the Moon shows how it reacts. If for example it has a connection to Mars, then it may be more assertive in having its needs met. Moon with Venus will emphasise its female or creative quality and Moon in aspect to Mercury may be able to express its feeling in some communicative way..