Gemini 3 Spacecraft Models

The crewmen made their first orbit change an hour and a half into the flight. The burn lasted 75 seconds and moved them from a 122-by-175-kilometer (66-by-94-nautical-mile) orbit to a nearly circular one with a drop in speed of 15 meters per second. The second burn, changing the orbital inclination by 0. 02 degrees, was made 45 minutes later. The last burn, during the third orbit, lowered the perigee to 72 kilometers (39┬ánmi). This was made so, in case the retrorockets had failed, the spacecraft would still have reentered the atmosphere. The experience of reentry initially matched expectations, with even the color and pattern of the plasma sheath that enveloped the capsule matching those produced for ground simulations. However, it soon became clear that Molly Brown was off course and would land 69 kilometers (37 nautical miles) off target. Though wind tunnel studies had suggested the spacecraft could maneuver to make up for the discrepancy, Gemini’s real lift was far less than predicted, and Grissom was unable to significantly adjust course. Molly Brown ultimately landed 84 kilometers (45 nautical miles) short of its intended splashdown point.



In September 2015, a new study provided an important missing piece to the intriguing puzzle of how our Moon came to be the lovely object that we see today. Have you ever had one of those days fishing where it seemed like you could do no wrong? Like everything you tried resulted in fish being caught? And not only fish being caught, but large fish being caught? This was all probably due to the moon and what phase the moon was in. That's right, something as simple as what phase the moon is in can have an effect on your fishing success. "Cassini's seven-plus years... have shown us how beautifully dynamic and unexpected the Saturn system is," commented project scientist Dr. Linda Spilker of NASA's JPL to Time Magazine's online edition on March 23, 2012.