Chrysler Voyager 1997 Tree

The 1996–1999 models in Mexico are rebadged Dodge Caravans, although the Caravan was sold alongside the Voyager. For 2000, the Chrysler Voyager was identical to the Plymouth Voyager except that the 3. 8 L V6 was not available. Base models of the Voyager were offered in most states with either a 2. 4 L four-cylinder or a 3. 0 L Mitsubishi V6 engine, except in California and several northeastern states, where the Mitsubishi V6 didn’t meet emissions standards. In those locales, the 3. 3 L engine was offered instead.
For the European market, Voyagers continued to be rebadged Caravans. Unique to this market were 2. 0 L Straight-4 SOHC and DOHC engines and 2. 5 L turbo diesel produced by VM Motori. European market vans also came with manual transmissions and in a six-passenger model with six captains chairs, not available elsewhere.



Ganymede: Ganymede is both the largest moon of Jupiter, our Solar System's planetary behemoth, as well as the largest moon in our entire Solar system. Observations of Ganymede by the HST in 2015 suggested the existence of a subsurface saline ocean. This is because patterns in auroral belts and rocking of the magnetic field hinted at the presence of an ocean. It is estimated to be approximately 100 kilometers deep with a surface situated below a crust of 150 kilometers. However, the astronomers will require more HST observations in order to obtain accurate measurements in order to determine if the moon's orbit is circular or elliptical. Preliminary estimates suggest that if the moon is in a circular orbit, it finishes a circle around Makemake in 12 days or longer. This gigantic "King of Planets" is considered by some astronomers to be a "failed star". It is about as large as a gas giant planet can be, and still be a planet. It is composed of approximately 90% hydrogen and 10% helium, with small amounts of water, methane, ammonia, and rocky grains mixed into the brew. If any more material were added on to this immense planet, gravity would hug it tightly--while its entire radius would barely increase. A baby star can grow to be much larger than Jupiter. However, a true star harbors its own sparkling internal source of heat--and Jupiter would have to grow at least 80 times more massive for its furnace to catch fire.