Chicago Symphony Orchestra Gustav Holst the Planets

In 2007, the Chicago Symphony formed its own recording label, CSO Resound©. After an agreement was reached with the Orchestra’s musicians, arrangements were made for new recordings to be released digitally at online outlets and on compact disc. The first CSO Resound CD, a recording of Haitink’s rendition of Mahler’s Third Symphony, was released in the spring of 2007. Releases that followed included Bruckner’s Seventh Symphony, Mahler’s Sixth Symphony, and Shostakovich’s Fourth Symphony (Grammy winner), all conducted by Haitink; Shostakovich’s Fifth Symphony led by Myung-Whun Chung; “Traditions and Transformations: Sounds of Silk Road Chicago” with the Orchestra’s Judson and Joyce Green Creative Consultant Yo-Yo Ma (Grammy winner); and recordings of Verdi’s Requiem (Grammy winner) and Otello, under the direction of Muti.



Bringing Birth Chart Astrology Down To Earth. This the first of a series of articles in which I try to bring Astrology down to Earth, by explaining what each planet represents in us at a basic level. This article explains the Moon, which is one of the Ego planets, Sun and Saturn being the other two, understanding each in turn and learning to see them as sub-personalities that need to work together to make you feel secure, worthwhile and complete. An awareness of these different energies will help in the understanding of your inner core self which is needed before the process of integration can successfully occur. Dr. Carolyn Porco, a planetary scientist and leader of the Imaging Science team for Cassini, explained to the press in March 2012 that "More than 90 jets of all sizes near Enceladus's south pole are spraying water vapor, icy particles, and organic compounds all over the place. Cassini has flown several times now through this spray and has tasted it. And we have found that aside from water and organic material, there is salt in the icy particles. The salinity is the same as that of Earth's oceans." A billion years ago, our Moon was closer to Earth than it is now. As a result, it appeared to be a much larger object in the sky. During that ancient era, if human beings had been around to witness such a sight, it would have been possible to see the entire Moon--not merely the one near side face that we see now. A billion years ago, it took our Moon only twenty days to orbit our planet, and Earth's own day was considerably shorter--only eighteen hours long. Stupendous, almost unimaginably enormous tides, that were more than a kilometer in height, would ebb and flow every few hours. However, things changed, as the lunar orbit around our primordial planet grew ever wider and wider. Annually, Earth's Moon moves about 1.6 inches farther out into space. Currently, the lunar rate of rotation, as well as the time it takes to circle our planet, are the same.