Buzz Lightyear NASA Suit

In Toy Story, Buzz Lightyear is given to a boy named Andy Davis from his mother as a birthday present. Buzz does not realize that he just toy modeled after the character, believing that he is a bona fide Space Ranger instead, and that it is his mission to protect the galaxy from the Evil Emperor Zurg, as well as that his laser is a fatal weapon and his wings enable him to fly. He quickly becomes Andy’s favorite toy, making Andy’s original favorite toy, a cowboy doll named Sheriff Woody, feel jealous. The effects of Woody’s jealousy eventually leads both him and Buzz to be captured by Sid Phillips, the toy-torturing boy who lives next door to Andy’s house. While imprisoned in Sid’s house, Buzz Lightyear sees a television ad featuring himself and realizes that he is a toy and not a Space Ranger. But when he tries to fly out of the window, he falls, causing him to break his arm. Upon understanding this, Buzz Lightyear becomes depressed, but Woody eventually convinces him that it is a good thing. Buzz regains hope and working together, the two escape Sid, return to Andy (who decides that Woody and Buzz are his joint favorite toys) and become best friends.



"Makemake is in the class of rare Pluto-like objects, so finding a companion is important. The discovery of the moon has given us an opportunity to study Makemake in far greater detail than we ever would have been able to without the companion," Dr. Parker continued to explain. The tiny moon--which for now has been designated S/2015 (136472) 1, and playfully nicknamed MK 2, for short--is more than 1,300 times dimmer than Makemake itself. MK 2 was first spotted when it was about 13,000 miles from its dwarf planet parent, and its diameter is estimated to be about 100 miles across. Makemake is 870 miles wide, and the dwarf planet, which was discovered over a decade ago, is named for the creation deity of the Rapa Nui people of Easter Island. But small moons like Methone are usually geologically inactive and bereft of an atmosphere. Therefore, they are usually unable to smooth away the scars. Dr. Peter Thomas of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, explained it this way in the May 17, 2013 New Scientist: "When we look at objects less than 200 kilometers in radius, they are all like potatoes. They have lumps, grooves, craters." This makes Methone's smooth surface a mystery. Dr. Thomas is a Cassini team member.