Astronomy Sketch Tattoo



Galilean Moons Of Jupiter. One dark, clear January night in 1610, Galileo Galilei climbed to the roof of his house in Padua. He looked up at the sky that was speckled with the flickering fires of a multitude of starry objects, and then aimed his small, primitive "spyglass"--which was really one of the first telescopes--up at that star-blasted sky above his home. Over the course of several such starlit, clear winter nights, Galileo discovered the four large Galilean moons that circle around the largest planet in our Sun's family, the enormous, gaseous world, Jupiter. This intriguing quartet of moons--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--were named for four of the numerous mythic lovers of the King of the Roman gods. Saturn is the smaller of the two gas-giant planets, twirling around our Sun, in the outer regions of our Solar System--far from the delightful warmth of our lovely incandescent roiling gas-ball of a Star. Jupiter is the larger of the duo of gas-giants dwelling in our Solar System, as well as the largest planet in our Sun's bewitching family, which is composed of eight major planets, an assortment of moons and moonlets, and a rich menagerie of smaller objects. Saturn is the second-largest planet in our Solar System--and probably the most beautiful. The very productive Cassini mission might attain some indirect information by analyzing the ring arc material--however, it is unlikely to come close to the little moon again before the mission ends in 2017.