Apollo 5 Rocket

On January 22, 1968, Apollo 5 lifted off just before sunset. The Saturn IB worked perfectly, inserting the second stage and LM into a 163 × 222 km orbit. The nose cone was jettisoned, and after a coast of 43 minutes 52 seconds, the LM separated from its adapter, with a 167 × 222 km orbit. After two orbits, the first planned 39-second descent-engine burn was started, but aborted by the Apollo Guidance Computer after only 4 seconds. Shortly before launch there was a suspected fuel leak, and a decision was made to delay arming the engine until the time of ignition.
This change had increased the time required for the propellant tanks to pressurize and thrust to build to the required level. NASA didn’t communicate this change to the AGC programmers. This led to the AGC not measuring any thrust within the predefined time and aborted the maneuver.



Makemake is about a fifth as bright as Pluto. However, despite its comparative brightness, it was not discovered until well after a number of much fainter KBOs had been detected. Most of the scientific hunts for minor planets are conducted relatively close to the region of the sky that the Sun, Earth's Moon, and planets appear to lie in (the ecliptic). This is because there is a much greater likelihood of discovering objects there. Makemake is thought to have evaded detection during earlier searches because of its relatively high orbital inclination, as well as the fact that it was at its greatest distance from the ecliptic at the time of its discovery--in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices. Dr. Jason Soderblom said in a September 10, 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Press Release that the evolution of lunar porosity can provide scientists with valuable clues to some of the most ancient life-supporting processes occurring in our Solar System. Dr. Soderblom is a planetary research scientist in MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The team's findings can also be applied to exoplanets, which are planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Some super-Earth exoplanets, which are rocky planets more massive than our own, have been proposed as "water worlds" covered with churning oceans. Could they have life? Perhaps. The potential would certainly be there. Dr. Vance and his team believe laboratory experiments and more sophisticated modeling of exotic oceans might help to find answers to these very profound questions.