Apollo 13 Mission Flight Planning Team

Apollo 13’s designated landing site was near Fra Mauro crater; the Fra Mauro formation was believed to contain much material spattered by the impact that had filled the Imbrium basin early in the Moon’s history. Dating it would provide information not only about the Moon, but about the Earth’s early history. The landing site was near what was dubbed Cone crater, a site where an impact was believed to have drilled deep into the lunar regolith. Due to the roughness of the terrain, the selected landing site was over a mile (two kilometers) from Cone crater, but Lovell, who as commander was to perform the landing, had the option of setting down closer if he believed he could do so safely. NASA initially had few high-quality photographs of that location, but after Apollo 12 took more from orbit in November 1969, Fra Mauro was confirmed as Apollo 13’s landing site.



The discovery of a moon for Makemake may have solved one perplexing puzzle concerning this distant, icy object. Earlier infrared studies of the dwarf planet showed that while Makemake's surface is almost entirely frozen and bright, some areas seem to be warmer than other areas. Astronomers had suggested that this discrepancy may be the result of our Sun warming certain dark patches on Makemake's surface. However, unless Makemake is in a special orientation, these mysterious dark patches should cause the ice dwarf's brightness to vary substantially as it rotates. But this amount of variability has not been observed. The scientists also ruled out the possibility that the mysterious features actually exist on Titan's surface in the form of frozen methane rain or icy lava erupted from cryovolcanoes. Such surface features would show a different chemical signature and would be visible for much longer periods of time than the bright features observed in this study. The bright features were visible from time spans of only 11 hours to five weeks. The fact is, the moon really does have a direct impact on the number of fish you catch and the size of those fish. The reason is that the gravitational pull of the moon on the earth affects the places and the timing of fish feeding patterns, and in fact almost every animal that is not a primate. Fish are particularly susceptible to the gravitational effects of the moon because of the differing heights of the tides. When you think about, the moon has a direct effect on the entire environment in which fish live!